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The Best CPUs in 2024

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Intel Core i5 14600K 14-Core, 20-Thread CPU

The advent of Intel’s new 14th-generation CPUs builds on the success of its 13th-generation Raptor Lake-based CPUs with higher clocks and, in some cases, higher core counts in tow. Meanwhile, AMD clings firmly to its X3D CPU-induced wins in gaming, making it quite challenging for players to choose the best CPU for their PC rig.



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While most modern CPUs are good at gaming with equal performance in most games in GPU-bound titles, some rise above the rest when the tables turn and CPU-intensive game engines come into play, such as with Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Dota 2, Valorant, and other Esports titles for example. At the same time, some of the fastest CPUs for gaming right now are built specifically to maximize their gaming performance versus productivity, making them a tad slower when it comes to productivity-related benchmarks that concentrate on the raw power of a CPU running optimized multithreaded workloads.


Related

The Best Gaming CPUs in 2024

PC gaming is an increasingly competitive space when it comes to hardware options, but some CPUs tend to be better at gaming specifically.

When choosing a CPU, consider these factors:

When it comes to picking a CPU, there are currently more choices than ever before with both Intel and AMD offering motherboards that have been out for over a year that work with 3 and 2 different CPU generations respectively (considering the X3D lineup a different CPU generation). This means that one needs to take a better look at what fits their needs, which could range from general-purpose uses to gaming to hardcore productivity-centric tools. The key metrics for identifying and picking a CPU based on performance that works for a given user include but may not be limited to:

Anyone looking for the best of both worlds can benefit from these top-tier CPUs, which include the best overall CPUs for productivity and gaming.


Game Rant’s Picks for the Best CPUs in 2024

Intel’s 14th generation CPUs are a chip off the old block, refreshing the 13th generation’s offerings with higher clocks across the board, higher efficiency core counts (Core i7 14700K), and access to Intel’s APO scheduler optimizations (14700K and 14900K) in addition to AI tuning for the highest-end Intel CPUs (Core i9 14900K/KF). This, coupled with no releases by AMD in its segment since mid-2023, essentially pits the 14600K versus its predecessor, the Core i5 13600K, in a way that might not flatter most users looking for an upgrade in 2024.

As a standalone product, however, the Intel Core i5 14600K has everything one needs: It comes unlocked out of the box and can be pushed higher easily (with adequate cooling), has respectable gaming performance that exceeds AMD’s offerings at the $300 MSRP mark, and has arguably superior multicore performance, making it a well-rounded mid-range productivity powerhouse.


The best thing going for the Intel Core i5 14600K is that it retains the price point of the now-aging 13600K while offering marginally better performance against competition that has not upped its stakes across the board in 2024, making the 14600K an obvious, albeit slightly unimpressive upgrade for users looking to move from their 12th generation or earlier Intel or AM4-based AMD CPUs to a newer CPU this year.

Amd Ryzen 7 7800X3D

AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D

The Best CPU for Gaming

Octa Core Gaming Supremacy

$369 $450 Save $81

The AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D is AMD’s latest and greatest CPU when it comes to gaming. With an excellent and highly efficient gaming performance that tops the charts currently, the Ryzen 7 7800X3D is here to stay and has a crown to claim thanks to its 3D V-Cache-enabled prowess when it comes to gaming on a PC.

The octa-core CPU currently happens to be the fastest in the business for gaming even as it leads efficiency charts at the top, making it a very sought-after gaming upgrade.

Brand
AMD

CPU Model
Ryzen 7 7800X3D

CPU Socket
AM5

Cores
8

Threads
16

PCIe 4.0 Support
Yes, Supports up to PCI-E 5.0

Architecture
Zen 4

Process
5nm

Base Clock Speed
4.2GHz

Boost Clock Speed
5.0GHz

Cache
8MB L2 + 96MB L3

TDP
120W

iGPU
Yes, Integrated Radeon 2 Core

Pros

  • Offers the fastest gaming performance money can buy in 2024
  • One of the most efficient processors available for gaming, clocking in just under 50W for most titles
  • Runs cooler than most of its competitors when gaming
  • Has considerably lower thermal requirements than its nearest competitor
Cons

  • Lackluster productivity performance as an octa-core CPU

The AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D 8-Core 16-Thread processor is unapologetically designed to go for the jugular when it comes to gaming. AMD is putting its 3D V-Cache technology to full use to push out a processor that makes the most of it for gaming this year as it aims to dethrone Intel’s recent dominance when it comes to gaming-related benchmarks and real-world performance.

While the AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D was launched after its core-heavy 3D V-Cache-enabled siblings, the Ryzen 9 7900X3D and the Ryzen 9 7950X3D it isn’t difficult to see why; it often outperforms its own larger sibling, the Ryzen 9 7950X3D in some gaming benchmarks, retaining its position as the new king of the hill for gaming for nearly a year at the time of writing.


What is not surprising, but still a bit disappointing for some power users, is its lack of productivity-based software gains thanks to the added 3D V-Cache, but that can be reasoned away somewhat as AMD’s last generation X3D processor, the capable 5800X3D also exhibited similar behavior: It was slower than the Ryzen 7 5800X in most productivity-based performance tests.

All in all, the Ryzen 7 7800X3D is the best CPU for gaming and a solid performer that doesn’t cost as much as its competitors when it comes to gaming while dominating the playing field with some of the best scores in multiple benchmarks that cement it as the best gaming CPU money can buy currently. It also happens to be on sale at a variety of retailers at discounts that come close to $100 off MSRP, making it a direct competitor at times to the 14600K versus the 14700K at the moment.


Related

Intel Core i9 14900K Vs AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D: Is The Refresh Enough?

How does Intel’s fastest CPU to date stack up against AMD’s best gaming CPU post-launch?

Intel Core i9 14900K 24-Core, 32-Thread CPU

Intel Core i9 14900K 24-Core, 32-Thread CPU

The Best CPU for Productivity

Raw Unadulterated Power On Tap

$592 $625 Save $33

The Intel Core i9 14900K 24-Core, 32-Thread CPU is Intel’s highest-end 14th generation CPU and offers the highest boost clocks for a consumer-grade CPU from Intel to date, clocking in at an impressive 6 GHz natively.

It succeeds the limited-release Intel Core 13900KS as the first mainstream 6 GHz CPU, even as it brings a large power draw and thermal requirement in tow to reach said clock speed.

Brand
Intel

CPU Model
Core i9 14900K

CPU Socket
LGA 1700

Cores
24 (8P + 16E)

Threads
32

Architecture
Raptor Lake (Refresh)

Process
Intel 7 (10 nm)

Base Clock Speed
3.2 GHz

Boost Clock Speed
6 GHz

Cache
32MB L2 + 36MB L3 Cache

TDP
253 W

PCIe
PCI-E 4.0/5.0 supported

Graphics
Intel UHD Graphics 770

Pros

  • Can push up to 6GHz speeds out of the box with compatible hardware
  • Has the best multi-core performance from a desktop-class CPU currently
  • Works with older 12th/13th-gen Intel motherboards with a BIOS update
  • Comes with Intel’s new XTU AI tweaking tool that makes it a 1-button tweak
Cons

  • Runs considerably hotter than its competition when under load
  • Consumes considerably more power than most of its alternatives in the same performance bracket

The Core i9 14900K is Intel’s flagship CPU in the Raptor Lake Refresh lineup. It replaces the already-fast and multicore king of the hill, the Intel Core i9 13900K, and offers higher clocks than its predecessor on both its higher-end performance cores and its lower-clocked efficient cores by 200 MHz and 100 MHz, respectively. It offers best-in-class multicore performance and some of the best gaming performance to date in multiple titles, assisted by its ability to push clocks as high as 6GHz on multiple cores.

This advantage can be built up even further by using the Intel XTU AI tool that currently remains an exclusive for the Intel Core i9 14900K and KF, using it to profile and attempt to run suggested overclocks based on multiple data sets. This, in addition to Intel’s APO optimizations available in select titles, can occasionally beat out even AMD’s vaunted Ryzen 7 7800X3D in certain titles handily even as it remains a close second in most game-centric benchmarks.


While Intel’s quest for the fastest gaming CPU crown is ongoing with the Ryzen 7 7800X3D standing strong, the 14900K comes as close as possible to Raptor Lake while also pulling surprise wins in certain newer titles. It also decimates its competition when it comes to multicore performance, making a well-rounded productivity-centric CPU that also manages to game quite well, coming in a close second to its competition.

It does, however, require a significant cooling, power delivery, and power supply investment to ensure it truly shines, especially in the productivity department, where the chip can routinely cross 400W of power usage when pushed across all of its 24 cores. This can reflect in a significantly larger outlay for users not factoring in the added cost for upgrades across the board to run Intel’s finest in 2024.

AMD Ryzen™ 9 7950X 16-Core, 32-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor

AMD Ryzen™ 9 7950X 16-Core, 32-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor

Best Alternate CPU for Productivity

16-Core Efficiency Play

$550 $700 Save $150

The AMD Ryzen 9 7950X is the flagship processor of AMD’s Ryzen 7000 series. It can boost up to 5.7Ghz and delivers unheard-of efficiency while taking the multi-threading performance crown for a 16-core processor.

Socket
AMD AM5

Brand
AMD

TDP
170W

Cores
16

Threads
32

iGPU
Yes, RDNA2

L3 Cache
64MB

Base Clock
4.5Ghz

Boost Clock
5.7Ghz

Pros

  • Offers competitive productivity to 14900K at a lower cost
  • It has excellent overclockability support
  • Requires considerably less powerful cooling than its competition
  • Much more efficient than the competition for productivity workloads
Cons

  • Not one of the best CPUs in the market for gaming
  • Some of its direct competitors have slightly better multi-core performance for certain tasks

If gaming is not a prospective buyer’s only play when using a processor, the AMD Ryzen 9 7950X is an excellent choice that outperforms even the more expensive option, i.e., the Ryzen 7950X3D. This is because the latter has limitations when it comes to overclocking and pushing higher boost clock speeds due to the die design, unlike the 7950X which offers significantly higher boost clock speeds and enjoys overclocking support.


It has the highest boost clocks for an AMD processor to date out of the box, which allows it to retain a workload-based performance crown, replacing AMD’s previous 16-core offering in the same space, the Ryzen 9 5950X. It offers more performance on tap while trading at a decent discount over its launch MSRP even as the 7950X3D takes up the top consumer-grade slot, offering slightly better efficiency and significantly better gaming performance.

When all is said and done, the Ryzen 9 7950X is a 16-core, 32-thread processor at its core and a very capable one at that. It can also harness some of the latest advances that come bundled as part of its tech offerings as it embraces the AM5 platform: PCI-Express 5.0 and DDR5 memory support. It is also much more efficient than the competing Intel Core i9 14900K when it comes to multithreaded performance and offers lower power draw even when idle.


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Intel vs. AMD: Which CPUs are better?

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AMD Ryzen 5 5500

AMD Ryzen 5 5500

The Best Entry-Level CPU For Gaming

Calculated Zen 3 Bargain

The AMD Ryzen 5 5500 is a 6 core 12 thread processor that is an entry level 5000 series AMD Ryzen-based processor, featuring Zen 3 cores, but a relatively crippled PCI-E 3.0 interface at the processor level. This makes it an appealing choice over the 5600/5600X based on price alone.

Brand
AMD

CPU Model
Ryzen 5 5500

CPU Socket
AMD AM4

Cores
6

Threads
12

PCIe 4.0 Support
No

Process
TSMC 7nm FinFet

Boost Clock Speed
4.2 GHz

Cache
L3 Cache 16MB, L2 Cache 3MB

RAM
N/A

TDP
65W

iGPU
No

Pros

  • Offers more cores and threads than competing Intel CPUs
  • Comes unlocked out of the box
  • Is considerably more power efficient than its competition
Cons

  • Slower than Intel’s competing CPUs for gaming and some productivity use cases
  • Half the L3 cache compared to its bigger siblings
  • No integrated graphics on offer

Building an affordable gaming PC for under $500 is a challenging affair in 2024 thanks to inflation-induced price increases. This, however, does not extend to the CPU market thanks to the plethora of processors on the market, many of which provide astounding value for money. The Ryzen 5 5500 offers performance on par with the 5600X as it offers lower clocks, a halved L3 cache, and PCI-E 3.0 support compared to the higher-end Ryzen 5 5600 or 5600X CPUs, even as it offers an unlocked option under $100.

As a 6-core, 12-thread CPU, it hax better multicore performance versus Intel’s Core i3 12100/13100 CPUs, but delivers significantly worse single-core performance as a tradeoff, something that is visible in most older games. Some newer games do benefit from the added thread and CPU core count, making this a more well-rounded option.

Like most of its peers, the Ryzen 5 5500 skips on an iGPU making a discrete option the only way to get things done, but upgradability is seriously limited thanks to it offering only PCI-E 3.0 speeds to discrete GPUs and using the older AM4 platform, which means that linear upgrades are few and far between and limited to yesteryear’s Ryzen 7 5800X3D for gaming and Ryzen 9 5950X for productivity.


AMD Ryzen 5 7600X

AMD Ryzen 5 7600X

The Best Budget CPU for Gaming

Hexacore Value Play

$228 $240 Save $12

Gamers interested in upgrading to a newer CPU from Team Red will find the AMD Ryzen 5 7600X to be of spectacular value thanks to its high single-core performance, efficient hexacore architecture, and compatibility with newer technology such as PCI-E 5.0 and DDR5 memory. It also abandons AMD’s AM4 design, going for a pin-less processor offering by moving them to the motherboard instead.

Brand
AMD

CPU Model
Ryzen 5 7600X

CPU Socket
AMD AM5

Cores
6

Threads
12

PCIe 4.0 Support
PCI-E 5.0 and lower

Base Clock Speed
4.7 GHz

Boost Clock Speed
5.3 GHz

Cache
6MB L2 + 32MB L3 Cache

RAM
Up to 128 GB DDR5 5000 MHz

TDP
105W

UserBenchmark Ranking
27th

iGPU
2-Core AMD Radeon Graphics

Pros

  • Is a true upgrade to the excellent value AMD Ryzen 5 5600X processor with support for PCI-E 5.0, DDR, leveraging the new AM5 socket
  • Offers decent gaming and productivity performance gains over its last-generation sibling
  • Highly efficient compared to its direct competitors when it comes to power draw
Cons

  • Does not come with a stock cooler like the older Ryzen 5 5600X or the lower-clocked Ryzen 5 7600

The AMD Ryzen 5 7600X is an excellent hexacore CPU for gaming that is AMD’s mid-range play for a gaming processor that offers overclockability, decent gaming performance, and superior efficiency in a sub $200 package. It allows users to experience the AM5 platform without having to spend an arm and a leg in the process making it an excellent, well-rounded offering from Team Red for users looking to upgrade on a budget.

While AMD’s offering is somewhat limited in terms of core count thanks to its hexacore offerings, it does offer significantly more leeway in terms of efficiency, even if it comes considerably short of production workloads. Also included with the 7600X is an entry-level 2-core integrated Radeon graphics that allows end-users to use it for productivity without needing a secondary display option like its AM4-based predecessor that required a discrete solution.


All in all, if one is going AMD and is on a budget, the 7600X has them covered when it comes to delivering an efficient, gaming-centric performance that doesn’t break the bank while offering considerable value to the end user.

The AMD Ryzen 5 7600X sees competition from Intel’s core-heavy core i5 14400 and 14500 CPUs that do deliver better performance for productivity even as the 7600X remains ahead when it comes to gaming by a wide berth. It does, however, deliver on its promise of a very fast hexacore CPU that offers an efficient, gaming-centric AM5-based alternative for gamers looking to go AMD this round.

12700k

Intel Core i7-12700K CPU

The Best Mid-Range CPU for Productivity

Value Alder Lake Proposition

$237 $290 Save $53

The Intel Core i7-12700K is the last-generation Intel Core i7 processor from Intel. This CPU is near the top range of options in the Intel Core series of processors. It has a clock speed of 3.6 GHz and offers more cache, including 25 MB of L3 cache, and a hyper-threading feature, which allows it to deliver better performance in demanding apps and games. The graphics performance is provided by the built-in Intel UHD graphics controller. The processor is compatible with both previous and current Socket LGA-1700 motherboards.

Brand
Intel

CPU Model
Core i7 12700K

CPU Socket
LGA 1700

Cores
12 (8P + 4E)

Threads
20 (16P + 4E)

PCIe 4.0 Support
PCI-E 5.0 and 4.0 Support

Process
Intel 7 (10 nm Enhanced SuperFin)

Boost Clock Speed
5.0 GHz

Cache
12 MB L2, 25MB L3 Smart Cache

RAM
Upto DDR5 4800 MT/s

TDP
125 Typical, 190W Turbo

iGPU
Yes, Intel UHD 770 Integrated

Pros

  • Offers 8 Performance Cores and 4 efficiency cores
  • Supports up to 20 threads simultaneously
  • Considerably better value than certain 13th-generation CPUs due to its aggressive pricing
  • Works with all Intel LGA 1700 motherboards (12/13/14th gen)
  • Comes unlocked out of the box
Cons

  • Requires an adequate motherboard to max out its overclocking potential
  • Has a slightly inferior memory controller than its 13th-generation alternatives which limits memory overclocking
  • Has no stock cooler on offer

The aging Intel Core i7 12700K CPU still packs a powerful punch and is back in the limelight as one of the best CPUs at a fair price as a result of Intel’s extensive price cuts on Alder Lake. It comes overclocked out of the box, unlike the comparable Core i5 13500 CPU, while also offering 2 more performance (P-cores) cores while offering 4 less efficient (E-cores) cores as a result.


At the same time, the price tag, the better gaming and productivity performance, and the overclocking potential are strong proponents of what was a favorite CPU when Alder Lake launched. The fact that it runs on both Intel’s 12th and 13th generation motherboards, in addition to DDR4 and DDR5 memory depending on the motherboard of choice, makes it an appealing and balanced choice to consider.

With a total of 20 threads in play thanks to its 8 performance plus 6 efficient configuration, the i7 12700K is not a slouch in most productivity-centric workloads but does see a strong challenger in the Core i5 13600KF, which offers faster cores and better gaming performance. Intel is not oblivious to this and has marked the Alder Lake CPU down considerably as a result, pushing it much lower than its next-generation Core i5 alternative.

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AMD Ryzen 7 8700G 8-Core, 16-Thread CPU

AMD Ryzen 7 8700G 8-Core, 16-Thread CPU

The Best APU For Gaming And Productivity

Zen 4 Meets Powerful RDNA 3 Graphics

The AMD Ryzen 7 8700G 8-Core, 16-Thread CPU is a powerful APU that delivers modest gaming performance for PCs that do not currently utilize a discrete GPU by using the fastest iGPU solution currently available to end users.

It comes bundled with a stock cooler, an octa-core CPU config, and a rated TDP of 65W, making it a great well-priced alternative to many budget CPU and GPU combos on the market currently.

The AMD Ryzen 7 8700G also happens to be one of AMD’s first desktop CPUs that offers the AMD Ryzen AI engine built into the chip.

Brand
AMD

CPU Model
Ryzen 7 8700G

CPU Socket
AMD Socket AM5

Cores
8

Threads
16

PCIe 4.0 Support
Yes, 20 lanes (8 useable by GPU)

Base Clock Speed
4.2 GHz

Boost Clock Speed
5.1 GHz

Cache
L2 Cache: 8MB, L3 Cache: 16MB

TDP
65W

iGPU
AMD Radeon 780M (12 CU) 2900 MHz

Architecture
AMD Zen 4

Process
TSMC 4nm

Pros

  • Offers excellent entry-level gaming performance versus its predecessor
  • Highly efficient compared to its direct CPU + discrete competition
  • Comes with a beefy stock cooler as part of the package
  • Offers excellent current-gen Zen 4 cores in an octa-core configuration
  • Offers an unlocked CPU and GPU under the hood for overclockers
Cons

  • The PCI-E x8 limitation for future GPU upgrades might not be considered a great tradeoff by some users
  • Offers lower CPU boost clocks than other octa-core AMD CPUs

The AMD Ryzen 7 8700G offers newer Zen 4 cores in an 8-core, 16-thread configuration. It squares these off with a 12 CU RDNA 3 GPU that runs at a high 2.9GHz clock speed on-die even as the APU aims to target a 65W TDP that AMD offers to cool off with an included Wraith Spire cooler in the box. It is currently the CPU with the fastest integrated graphics, which makes it a very appealing option for gamers on a budget, SFF builders, and users looking for a capable HTPC without going overboard on their spend.


It leverages the AMD Radeon™ 780M mobile GPU to deliver on its promise to gamers for excellent entry-level FHD gaming performance and allows for upgrades down the line by embracing the AM5 socket, which is expected to have more options down the line. It does require fast DDR5 RAM, ideally clocked at 6400 MHz or higher to unlock its GPU performance even as it packs a dedicated Ryzen AI upgrade under the hood as one of the first desktop-class CPUs with the Ryzen 8000 moniker in play.

Users might not be thrilled to know that it is limited to PCI-E 4.0 speeds and at a reduced x8 bandwidth offering for discrete GPUs that could cripple some higher-end GPU upgrade options in the future. The iGPU’s strong dependence on higher-clocked RAM for better performance and, in some cases, power-limited clocks when running in unison with the CPU firing on all cylinders can be resolved for the most part but does in some cases add a layer of complexity that most tweakers (but not entry-level users) would revel in.


Note: It can be helpful to read Game Rant’s review of the AMD Ryzen 7 8700G APU to get a better idea of why the Ryzen 7 8700G is the most powerful APU money can buy in 2024.

How Important Is Single-Core CPU Performance For Gaming?

Single-core performance in a CPU is often touted, and rightly so, as an important metric to track when ascertaining a CPU’s performance potential. This is because of how video games generally work, a practice that stems from older video game engines being primarily single-threaded or not handling most of their logic across multiple threads. Most current video games also tend to be exceptionally reliant on a single thread (even those built on modern game engines at times), which also gives credence to this notion.

It is true that faster single-core performance more often than not does translate to significant performance uplifts for most modern titles. This is both due to a speedier single-core somewhat limiting the performance bottleneck that game engines experience where threads ‘wait’ on the primary thread to proceed before they can move to the next frame or render more objects. As a result, faster single-core performance allows for fewer resource ‘locks’ on a processor. At the same time, this is not the complete story.


Modern games attempt to increasingly leverage the extra horsepower that multicore CPUs give us. This is due to a multitude of factors but can be condensed down to a few simple factors;

  • Considerably more powerful game consoles: Since the last generation consoles from both Sony and Microsoft went for custom AMD x86 chips and the current generation has followed suit, much of the target platform development has been centered around an octa-core processor with the latest generation using custom AMD Zen 2-based APUs. This has allowed modern games to push for better use of limited resources on consoles, which translates to better, more optimal use of multicore CPUs in a bid to eke out more performance for game consoles and PCs alike.
  • Better, more optimized game engines: Game engines have come a long way and offer powerful optimization techniques and more fine-grained control to developers now than ever before to ensure better gaming performance on multicore CPUs which they previously couldn’t exploit as well as possible relative to potential performance.
  • Higher core counts in entry-level CPUs: Possibly one of the most important factors that have led to multicore CPUs receiving increasing amounts of optimization is that entry-level CPUs from Intel and AMD offer a minimum of 4 cores, with most offering 6 or more cores, allowing developers to assume a larger thread and core count than they previously could as a minimum specification, making it easier for them to assume a larger core count from the get-go when designing their games.


While it isn’t incorrect to say that multicore performance is a secondary factor to performance, it has increasingly become more relevant since the turn of the century and will continue to grow in terms of relevance as new titles continue to be released. Single-core performance in a way can be seen as the maximum cap of what potential a CPU can exhibit in modern games that otherwise have their multicore requirements met, making it a crucial benchmark for most modern games.

This is also why Intel & AMD focus on single-core performance for gaming-centric CPU offerings with higher clocks offered at the higher, multicore CPU tiers, which are normally reserved for enthusiast-tier gamers and creators such as the Intel Core i9 14900K.

The Bottom Line

More cores and higher clocks do not always equate to more performance and 16-core processors like the AMD Ryzen 9 7950X have a far smaller gap in terms of productivity workloads with the Core i9 14900K than raw core counts would suggest. At the same time, the current king of the hill for gaming is the AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D which decimates all of its competition with ease thanks to its 3D V-Cache implementation allowing it to work with larger amounts of data thanks to the extended L3 cache.


If one wishes to get the best value for money, both Intel’s Core i5 and AMD’s Ryzen 5 are where one needs to look in terms of an excellent price-to-performance ratio. If their plans are more centric on getting the best of the best, AMD’s Ryzen 9 7950X and Intel’s Core i9 14900K are excellent options. At the same time, the Ryzen 7 7800X3D makes its case for the best gaming CPU available despite being an octa-core processor in a segment that has plenty of cores to go around for high-end processors.

FAQ

Q: What is the fastest CPU For gaming?

The Fastest CPU for gaming currently is the AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D with an octa-core layout that is backed by AMD’s 3D V-Cache with AMD’s own Ryzen 9 7950X3D and Intel’s Core i9 13900KS coming in a close 2nd and 3rd place respectively.|

Q: What is the Fastest AMD CPU For Productivity?

The fastest consumer-grade AMD CPU for productivity is the 16-core, 32-thread Ryzen 9 7950X which is slightly faster in most productivity benchmarks compared to its more expensive Ryzen 9 7950X3D sibling due to a higher clock speed and TDP rating that help it perform better in non-gaming benchmarks.


Q: What is the Best CPU for Productivity?

As of September 2023, the fastest CPU for work is currently the Intel Core i9-14900KS which can do 6000MHz on single-core clocks while having 24 cores handling 32 threads that allow it to crunch numbers beyond most of its competitors.

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